Winners announced for the 2015 Dith Pran Instagram PhotoShootOut Competition

AAJA announces the winners of the 2015 Dith Pran Instagram PhotoShootOut Competition at the AAJA National Convention in San Francisco August 15. The theme of this year competition is “I Left My Heart in San Francisco.”

Winners of the Dith Pran Instagram Photo Shootout Awards. Photography by Greg Yamamoto
Contest directors Susan Choi, and James Yee, far left, read the winners of the Dith Pran Instagram Photo Shootout Awards. Winners from far right are James Tensuan (honorable mention), Tam Duong (third place), Kent Nishimura (second place), and Brandon Chew (first place). Photography by Greg Yamamoto

AAJA announces the winners of the 2015 Dith Pran Instagram PhotoShootOut Competition at the AAJA National Convention in San Francisco August 15. The theme of this year competition is “I Left My Heart in San Francisco.”

 

First place winner

1st place – Brandon Chew, San Jose State University, “Ferry Nice Selfie”. He wins registration for next year’s AAJA Convention and a perpetual trophy cup.

 

Second place winner

2nd place – Kent Nishimura, University of Hawaii, “Playing with Fire”. He wins FitBit watch.

 

Third place winner

3rd place – Tam Duong, California State University East Bay, “Companions”. He wins backpack and seat from the White House News Photographers Association and a photography book.

 

honorable mention winner

Honorable Mention – James Tensuan, San Jose State University, “A Suite Silhouette”. He wins backpack and seat from the White House News Photographers Association and a photography book.

 

Judges:
Stan Honda, New York freelance
Paul Kitagaki, Jr., Sacramento Bee
Kii Sato, Associated Press
Alex Wong, Getty Images
Greg Yamamoto, Hawaii freelance

For any questions, please aajaphoto@gmail.com

History: The AAJA PhotoShootOut was started in 2000 during the annual AAJA National Convention. The competition was changed in 2008 to honor New York Times photographer Dith Pran, who risked his life in Cambodia during the genocide by the Khmer Rouge to help journalists tell the story of atrocities in his home country. His story inspired the film, “The Killing Fields.” Pran passed away in 2008.

Thank you for helping AAJA photographers attend the 2015 convention

Friday, July 24 is the last day to donate to help Asian American professional photographers attend the AAJA national convention. We have already raised about $500.

If you (Asian American professional photographer/photo editor with more than 50 per cent of your income related to photography) are interested in coming to the convention and can’t afford and think you’d come with funding help, please let us know.

We have reached our present goal for paying registration for 13 photo students and three professional photographers to attend the convention.

Thank you to those individuals and companies that help make this all possible.

Stan Honda, Paul Sakuma, Paul Cheung Alex Wong, Dai Sugano, Kii Sato, James Yee, Susan Choi, Corky Lee, Baron Sekiya, Howard Hsu, Kathleen Carroll, Michael Quan, Jeff Chiu, Ringo Chiu, Paul Kitagaki, Jr., Daniel Sato, Kenneth Kwok, Grace How, John Mabanglo, Donna Tam, FoxNews, Sacramento Chapter, San Francisco Chapter, AAJA National, Michelle Anindya, Justin Seiter, and Kathy Chow. (In no particular order)

Stan Honda
AAJAphoto@gmail.com
www.AAJAphoto.org

Donation: www.aaja.org/donate-to…

AAJA is a non-profit 501(c)3 for any tax deduction purposes.

More information on the photography portion of the convention: www.aajaphoto.org

Angel Island Photo Tour, Saturday, August 15, 2015

Join freelance photographers Corky Lee and James Yee in a special AAJA tour of Angel Island Immigration Station. You don’t need to be a photographer. Everyone is welcome. Limited reservations required for guided and self-guided tours.

Looking for something interesting to do on Saturday, August 15, before the Gala Banquet in the evening? Want to find out about our ancestors who traveled from Asia to America to the “Ellis Island of the West?”

Join freelance photographers Corky Lee and James Yee in a special AAJA tour of Angel Island Immigration Station. You don’t need to be a photographer. Everyone is welcome. Limited reservations required for guided and self-guided tours.

The State Park Service docent led tour is $7 and starts at 11 a.m. at the Immigration Station.

Self-guided tours of the immigration station is $5.

Please RSVP by Wednesday, August 12. After August 12, you will be on wait list.

RSVP sign up: Corky Lee

Fees will be collected by the State Park Service at the Immigration Station. Make check payable to: “California State Parks. If paying by cash, please bring exact change. No credit cards.

Take a 25 minute ferry ride from San Francisco to Angel Island past the Golden Gate Bridge and Alcatraz Island. The ferry will first make a brief stop at Fisherman’s Wharf.

The immigration station is about a 20 to 30 minute walk up and down a hill from the dock. Bring your walking shoes; a coat since it might be chilly on the ferry; camera to photograph the barracks as it was in the early 1900s.

There is a snack bar at the pier on Angel Island. There are no other food and drink services on the island. Also a snack bar on the ferry.

The ferry leaves at 9:15 a.m. on Saturday, August 15 from the Ferry Terminal, across the street from the Hyatt Regency. About a five minute walk from the Hyatt to the Ferry Building (That’s the tower building across street from Hyatt with big clock tower). Purchase a round trip ticket on your own inside the main lobby of the Ferry Building. Cost is $18 round trip. Suggest purchasing ticket inside Ferry Building at least 15 minutes before ferry departs. Credit card/cash accepted.

The return ferry from Angel Island is at 3:15pm and arrives at San Francisco’s Fisherman’s Wharf Pier 41 at 3:40 p.m. The return ferry stops at Fisherman’s Wharf and does not stop back at the Ferry Terminal across Hyatt Hotel. Fisherman’s Wharf is 1.75 miles from the Hyatt. You will need to find transportation back to the hotel on your own. You can take the F trolley car back to the hotel. Also about a 30 minute walk. Or pedicab or taxi.

Angel Island history: From 1910 to 1940 the United States Immigration Station processed nearly a million immigrants. Most of immigrants were Chinese and Japanese who arrived at Angel Island and were detained for weeks. Some were detained up to 90 days and a very few for almost two years while their applications were considered. The immigration station is a now a National Historic Landmark. Many of the original barracks and other buildings are still standing. There is a wonderful museum with many artifacts.

More information:
James Yee
Corky Lee
AAJAphoto@gmail.com
Facebook: aajaphoto.org/fb